Native Title Act

Wearing two hats: The conflicting governance roles of native title corporations and community/shire councils in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community governance can be greatly impacted by the nature of the land tenure held or managed by the community. The fragmented system of national and state regimes which provide grants or titles of land to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people has enabled a governance landscape where there are often overlapping rights to land. This creates a situation where relationships within an Indigenous community – and even within a traditional owner group – are competing for power and control.

The right to protect sites: Indigenous heritage management in the era of native title

A large and profitable Indigenous heritage management industry has emerged in the wake of the resources boom of recent decades, with thousands of Indigenous heritage impact assessments conducted every year. Yet few governments have successfully reformed heritage laws to accommodate native title rights, and conflict over site destruction is regularly front page news.

Against native title

'Against native title' is about a divisive native title claim in the town of Ceduna where the claims process has thoroughly reorganised local Aboriginal identities over the course of the past decade. The central character in this story is senior Aboriginal woman Sue Haseldine, who, with her extended family, have experienced native title as an unwelcome imposition: something that has emanated from the state and out of which they gained only enemies. But this is not simply a tale of conflict.

Reforms to the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) Options Paper

The following submission is in response to the proposed technical amendments to the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) (NTA).

In this submission, AIATSIS welcomes changes that further the rights of native title claimants, holders and corporations in the areas of authorisation, agreement-making, governance and decision-making. AIATSIS suggests the amendments are expanded to address structural issues in the native title system.